conceit


conceit
conceit 1 Conceit, egotism, egoism, self-esteem, self-love, amour propre mean an attitude of regarding oneself with favor.
Conceit implies a conviction of superiority in one or more lines of achievement or an overweeningly favorable opinion of one's powers or accomplishments. It often connotes a failure to see oneself truly or an offensive, bumptious manner
{

to have lost the godlike conceit that we may do what we will, and not to have acquired a homely zest for doing what we can, shows a . . . mind that . . . forswears compromise— Hardy

}
{

conceit may puff a man up, but never prop him up— Ruskin

}
{

it was part of the author's formidable conceit that he wrote only for the most learned of his professional colleagues— Galbraith

}
Egotism stresses the tendency to attract attention to and center interest on oneself, one's thoughts, and one's achievements. The word sometimes implies contempt for but more often an overriding of or disregard for others' interests or opinions
{

a man and a boy of ten are perhaps better company than a man and a boy of fifteen. There's so much less egotism between them— H. G. Wells

}
{

egotism resides more in a kind of proud isolation, in a species of contempt for the opinions and aims of others— Benson

}
Egoism emphasizes concentration on oneself, one's interests, and one's needs. It seldom suggests a tendency to display oneself or to attract attention to oneself, but it commonly implies self-interest, especially as opposed to altruism or interest in others, as the inner spring of one's acts or as the measure by which all things are judged
{

she preferred to be herself, with the egoism of women— Meredith

}
{

the essence of a self-reliant and autonomous culture is an unshakable egoism. It must not only regard itself as the peer of any other culture; it must regard itself as the superior of any other— Mencken

}
Self-esteem implies a proper and balanced pride in oneself
{

ofttimes nothing profits more than self-esteem, grounded on just and right— Milton

}
{

love, hope, and self-esteem, like clouds depart and come, for some uncertain moments lent— Shelley

}
{

woman had the feeling of being a constructive factor in the economic process; thus she was provided with a sound basis for self-esteemHorney

}
Self-love usually implies an abnormal regard for oneself that excludes or overshadows all other interests or affections. On the other hand it occasionally designates that degree of love for oneself or interest in one's well-being which is the proper and necessary complement of one's love for others
{

but 'tis not easy with a mind like ours ... to bid the pleadings of self-love be still— Cowper

}
{

self-love but serves the virtuous mind to wake, as the small pebble stirs the peaceful lake . . . friend, parent, neighbor, first it will embrace; his country next; and next all human race— Pope

}
Amour propre comes closer to self-esteem, for it stresses pride, usually pardonable pride, in oneself. It is therefore used when the idea of sensitiveness to others' opinions is indicated
{

the amour propre of the French people had been outraged— Holt & Chilton

}
{

she flattered his amour propre by asking that from his generosity which she could have taken as a right— Reade

}
Analogous words: *pride, vanity, vainglory: arrogance, superciliousness, insolence (see corresponding adjectives at PROUD): complacency, smugness, priggishness (see corresponding adjectives at COMPLACENT)
Antonyms: humility
Contrasted words: humbleness, modesty, meekness, lowliness (see corresponding adjectives at HUMBLE): diffidence, shyness, bashfulness (see corresponding adjectives at SHY)
2 *caprice, freak, fancy, whim, whimsy, vagary, crotchet

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Conceit — Con*ceit , n. [Through French, fr. L. conceptus a conceiving, conception, fr. concipere to conceive: cf. OF. p. p. nom. conciez conceived. See {Conceive}, and cf. {Concept}, {Deceit}.] 1. That which is conceived, imagined, or formed in the mind;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Conceit — Con*ceit , v. t. To conceive; to imagine. [Archaic] [1913 Webster] The strong, by conceiting themselves weak, are therebly rendered as inactive . . . as if they really were so. South. [1913 Webster] One of two bad ways you must conceit me, Either …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Conceit — Con*ceit , v. i. To form an idea; to think. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Those whose . . . vulgar apprehensions conceit but low of matrimonial purposes. Milton. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • conceit — (n.) late 14c., something formed in the mind, thought, notion, from conceiven (see CONCEIVE (Cf. conceive)) based on analogy of deceit and receipt. Sense evolved from something formed in the mind, to fanciful or witty notion (1510s), to vanity (c …   Etymology dictionary

  • conceit — index idea, jactation Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

  • conceit — [n] egotism amour propre, arrogance, complacence, complacency, consequence, immodesty, narcissism, outrecuidance, pomposity, pride, self admiration, self exaltation, selfimportance, self love, self regard, smugness, snottiness, stuffiness,… …   New thesaurus

  • conceit — ► NOUN 1) excessive pride in oneself. 2) an elaborate metaphor or artistic effect. 3) a fanciful notion. ORIGIN from CONCEIVE(Cf. ↑conceive) …   English terms dictionary

  • conceit — [kən sēt′] n. [ME conceite < conceiven,CONCEIVE] 1. Obs. a) an idea; thought; concept b) personal opinion 2. an exaggerated opinion of oneself, one s merits, etc.; vanity 3. [< It concetto, of same ult. orig.] …   English World dictionary

  • Conceit — For other uses, see Conceit (disambiguation). In literature, a conceit[1] is an extended metaphor with a complex logic that governs a poetic passage or entire poem. By juxtaposing, usurping and manipulating images and ideas in surprising ways, a… …   Wikipedia

  • conceit — [[t]kənsi͟ːt[/t]] conceits 1) N UNCOUNT: also a N (disapproval) Conceit is very great pride in your abilities or achievements that other people feel is too great. He knew, without conceit, he was considered a genius... Pamela knew she was a good… …   English dictionary


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.